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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
CNBC
Dec 11, 2012 6:00am EST
are in a very good environment. and in north america, obviously, is important. europe is obviously important. but you're focusing on emerging markets. >> yes. >> even putting manufacturing, which i'm not sure, why would you build -- you're building a $100 million plant in africa. why not just export to avenue from from other places? why build a plant in africa? >> we have going to affect the organization from here. this was a unique opportunity because it was a state-owned factory. we managed to take over and they needed technology. and why produce there is a huge market. there are 1 billion people right now, the population will double. >> on the continent? >> yeah. on the continent of africa. they have a problem with feud security now. they have 60% of the global reserves of tillable land, which is great news, and only 20% of this land are used today, are farms today. therefore, it is a very interesting market. i'm very proud that we discovered it first and that we will be there also the first to manufacture from the western global players. >> so private corporation. who needs to go into th
CNBC
Dec 10, 2012 6:00am EST
and where to spend it, as they look at the u.s., what they want to see is a stable environment to put that money to work. if we can get that capital into the u.s. that will be a stimulus program by itself. >> frits, we pending on how you look at the numbers there are peel who say these two proposals aren't that far off. if you look at the numbers on each side and maybe try to find some common ground in the middle, maybe get to $1.2 trillion, where do you go on spending cuts is the big question because that seems to be a little easier. do you think this needs to be a three to one when it comes to revenue versus revenue increase or three to one when it comes to spending cuts versus revenue increases? do you see one to one, what would make you feel good looking around the globe and looking at what -- >> i'm not a tax expert so i can't give you a precise ratio. what we need to do is see a program where, if you look at reasonable numbers, you could see that the debt-to-gdp ratio comes down over time. as we go from $16 trillion, as we cross that 100% mark, we start looking more and more lik
CNBC
Dec 12, 2012 6:00am EST
american corporations have done a terrific job of coping with a tough regulatory environment, a tough financial. the aftermath of this financial crisis. a lot of negative publicity. and made a lot of money. >> we want to rise above. do we not have a debt ceiling right after that? >> the debt ceiling. the interesting question whether they're going to roll -- >> here's what i think. we haven't talked about this. so i say president obama allows us to go over the cliff temporarily so that all the rates go up. then the democrats introduce a bill to lower it for 9 %, do some other stiff -- 98%, do some other stuff they want to do. then the republicans say fine but we've got to hold the debt ceiling, that's the next bargaining chip. i don't think we can use rides above for the debt ceiling because we don't want to rise above the debt ceiling. we have to come one new buttons -- >> pins, the whole thing. yeah. that is a dilemma. what a polemic -- >> constantino is cutting me off. you're going to hold that against me? all right. >> you can hear the voice in my head. >> yeah. he's mad because i
CNBC
Dec 6, 2012 6:00am EST
. >> is it possible to ever get back to that in this environment? >> it is. you have a lot of problems with the piece. >> do you briyou believe if you rote deficit -- two different ways. you either keep the government that you have and pay for it by raising taxes, or you kind of leave taxes where they are and you shrink government down to where it pays for it. does it matter for the future and for growth which way you do it in your view? >> it does. if you put it all into like a tightening, so how much tightening occurs in the economy that would slow the economy, it's far better to actually reduce government spending than it is to actually raise taxes. >> although that hurts the economy, too. >> everything hurts the economy. so it's a question of which is most -- or least harmful and that tends to be cutting government spending. >> but i do think it's -- >> although tim geithner would disagree with me. >> one side wants to keep the government and entitlements like we have it. and the other side wants to take away all the excess government -- >> i think both sides agree that you need to do both. just
CNBC
Dec 7, 2012 6:00am EST
. >> what happens to the money? >> what always happens to money. we have an environment where the interest rates are low, so if you reinvest it in a fixed income product, you won't make much return. you'll have capital losses on bonds. i'm very concerned about the low interest rate in the bond market and the long period of time we've had bond yield this is low. and in the stock market, you have to be careful because there could be a sorting out among stocks between high and low dividend stocks and how they perform when these guys go x dividend. >> why couldn't you invest in g chlt and g e or comcast and get a 3% yield there. either one would be a good place.or comcast and get a 3% y there. either one would be a good place. >> wasn't i invested in company x before, didn't i have that money in there and now they're giving it back? >> now you own a larger part of the company. >> no, because -- >> if you reinvest it and they buy more share, you own a larger piece of it. >> it should be equal. they've taken that cash out of the company. the stock price should adjust lower. >> but cash is not th
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5